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SEPTEMBER 2020 - FLU VACCINES ARE NOW AVAILABLE AT THE SURGERY - DUE TO THE CURRENT COVID-19 SITUATION WE WILL BE CONTACTING PATIENTS WHO ARE ELIGIBLE FOR THE FLU VACCINE BY TELEPHONE OR LETTER TO ATTEND THE SURGERY FOR AN APPOINTMENT ONLY.  

URGENT NOTICE - DUE TO CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK WE WILL BE USING A TELEPHONE TRIAGE SYSTEM FOR THE FORSEEABLE FUTURE TO REDUCE THE RISK OF SPREAD.  IF YOUR PROBLEM IS AN EMERGENCY PLEASE PHONE THE SURGERY BETWEEN 8.30AM AND 10.30AM.  PLEASE LEAVE YOUR NAME, CONTACT NUMBER AND A BRIEF DESCRIPTION WITH THE RECEPTIONISTS AND A DOCTOR WILL GET BACK TO YOU.

DUE TO THE HIGH VOLUME OF CALLS FOR TELEPHONE CONSULTATION WITH THE GP WE ARE LIMITING THE DAILY CALLS TO 30 PER DAY.  THE PRACTICE IS EXTREMELY BUSY AT PRESENT DUE TO THE CURRENT COVID 19 CRISIS AND THE GP WILL ONLY TELEPHONE ONCE.  THANK YOU FOR YOUR CO-OPERATION IN THIS MATTER.

IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING ORDERING PRESCRIPTIONS - DO NOT ATTEND THE SURGERY YOU MUST ORDER PRESCRIPTIONS BY TELEPHONE ON 028 90391690 BETWEEN 10.30AM TO 12.45PM AND FROM 2PM TO 3PM OR VIA THE 24 HOUR REPEAT PRESCRIPTION LINE ON 028 90721540.  AS YOU CAN APPRECIATE OUR PHONELINES ARE EXTREMELY BUSY, PLEASE BE PATIENT - THANK YOU.

DUE TO THE CURRENT SITUATION YOU MUST ALLOW AT LEAST 48 - 72 HOURS FROM THE ISSUING OF YOUR PRESCRIPTION TO COLLECTING YOUR PRESCRIPTION FROM THE PHARMACY.  AS YOU CAN APPRECIATE THE SURGERY AND THE PHARMACY ARE EXTREMELY BUSY, PLEASE BE PATIENT - THANK YOU.  

WE WOULD LIKE TO WELCOME OUR NEW GP DR. FAYE GIBSON TO LIGONIEL HEALTH CENTRE.  DR. GIBSON COMMENCED WORKING AT THE SURGERY ON THE 2ND APRIL 2019. GOOD LUCK FAYE!

IMPORTANT INFORMATION - WE ARE CHANGING TO A COMPLETELY NEW COMPUTER SYSTEM AND GO LIVE ON TUESDAY 28TH NOVEMBER, 2017.  THIS INVOLVES A LOT OF PREPARATION BEFOREHAND AND ON THE GO LIVE DAY.  WE WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR PATIENCE BEFORE AND AFTER THE 28TH NOVEMBER 2017 TO ALLOW US TO ADJUST TO THE NEW SYSTEM, THANK-YOU.

FROM TUESDAY 2ND MAY 2017 THERE WILL BE A NEW GP APPOINTMENT SYSTEM IN PLACE.  THIS SYSTEM WILL OPERATE WITH APPOINTMENTS BEING ALLOCATED ON A DAILY BASIS ONLY.  IF YOU NEED TO SEE A DOCTOR, PLEASE PHONE THE SURGERY BETWEEN 8.30AM AND 10.00AM ON THE DAY.  DUE TO NUMEROUS MISSED AND UNCANCELLED APPOINTMENTS, BOOKING IN ADVANCE IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE.  

IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO ATTEND YOUR APPOINTMENT WITH THE DOCTOR OR THE NURSE, PLEASE PHONE THE SURGERY TO CANCEL THE APPOINTMENT SO THAT WE CAN ACCOMMODATE OTHER PATIENTS WHO NEED SEEN.

COMMENCING OCTOBER 2017 WE HAVE A NEW SMOKING CLINIC EVERY FRIDAY AFTERNOON BETWEEN 2PM AND 3.30PM.  OUR NEW COUNSELLOR IS SHARON MCCULLOUGH FROM CANCER FOCUS NI.  PLEASE CONTACT THE SURGERY TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT.

IF YOU ARE TRAVELLING ABROAD AND REQUIRE VACCINATIONS, PLEASE CONTACT THE SURGERY 4 - 6 WEEKS PRIOR TO YOUR DATE OF TRAVEL, IT TAKES TIME TO CHECK UP ON YOUR VACCINATION HISTORY, ORDER THE VACCINATIONS AND BOOK AN APPOINTMENT WITH THE NURSE TO ADMINISTER THEM.  PLEASE GIVE AS MUCH NOTICE AS YOU POSSIBLY CAN.

   

 

 

 

 

Family Health

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Child Health 7 to 15 Years

Men

Women

Cervical Screening (Smear Tests)

 

Cervical screening is a method of preventing cervical cancer by detecting abnormal cells in the cervix (lower part of the womb). Cervical screening is not a test for cancer, but it is a test to check the health of the cervix.

Most women's test results show that everything is normal. But for one in 20 women, the test will show some changes in the cells of the cervix. Most of these changes will not lead to cervical cancer and the cells will go back to normal on their own. In some cases, the abnormal cells need to be treated to prevent them becoming a problem later.

NHS - Cervical Screening
The why, when & how guide to cervical screening

NHS Inform (Scottish Patients)
Cervical Screening information, risks, benefits and tests for patients based in Scotland

Cervical Screening
This factsheet is for women who would like information about having a cervical smear test for screening. This means having the test when you don't have any symptoms.


HPV Vaccination

Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV). There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls.

The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.

What is Human papilloma virus (HPV)?
Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. These membranes are called the mucosa.

There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk.

 

How you get HPV?
Types of HPV that affect the skin can be passed on by skin contact with an affected person. The types of HPV that affect the mouth and throat can be passed on through kissing. Genital HPV is usually spread through intimate, skin to skin, contact during sex. You can have the genital HPV virus for years and not have any sign of it.

How HPV can cause cervical cancer?
Most HPV infections are harmless or cause genital warts, however some types can cause cervical cancer. Most HPV infections clear up by themselves, but in some people the infection can last a long time. HPV infects the cells of the surface of the cervix where it can stay for many years without you knowing.

The HPV virus can damage these cells leading to changes in their appearance. Over time, these changes can develop into cervical cancer. The purpose of cervical screening (testing) is to detect these changes, which, if picked up early enough, can be treated to prevent cancer happening. If they are left untreated, cancer can develop and may lead to serious illness and death.

Cancer Research UK
HPV Facts and information

NHS - HPV Vaccination Why, how and when is the vaccination given and what are the side effects

HPV Vaccine
This factsheet is for people who would like information about the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine.


Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK. About 46,000 women get breast cancer in the UK each year. Most of them (8 out of 10) are over 50, but younger women, and in rare cases men, can also get breast cancer.

The NHS Breast Screening Programme invites over 2 million women for screening every year, and detects over 14,000 cancers. Dr Emma Pennery of Breast Cancer Care says: “Breast X-rays, called mammograms, can detect tumours at a very early stage, before you’d feel a lump. The earlier it’s treated, the higher the survival rate.”

Find out more about breast cancer screening 

Macmillan Cancer Research
The causes and symptoms of breast cancer in women and explains how it is diagnosed and treated

NHS
Symtpoms, diagnosis, treatment, prevention & screening information


NHS Conditions and Treatments

See the NHS Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues.


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Seniors

Sexual Health

 
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